Welcome to RMA

The Resource Management Agency strives to ensure that its customer service standards are consistent with the Agency’s Mission Statement:

The mission of the Resource Management Agency, in cooperation with the public and our partner agencies, is to protect the consumer and community’s health, safety and environment by carrying out adopted laws and policies, and educating, assisting and empowering Ventura County residents and businesses to be good stewards of the land and our resources.

Values

In addition, RMA has identified those core values which will guide us in carrying out our mission. These values are directly related to our customer service and include:

  • Honesty, hard work and ethical behavior

  • Transparency and accountability

  • Equitable treatment and respect of all constituents

  • Excellence in service delivery

closing statement
VCEMERGENCY new logo

Food Facilities Closures

Restaurant, food truck and other food facilities closure information - Inspector initiated and Owner initiated closures

Building Codes & Information

Find the 2019 Ventura County Building Codes - other code related information and handouts

Get a Permit

Building Permits, Food Facilities Permits, Film Permits, Home Business Permits - all permitting related items

Payments and Fees

RMA accepts cash, checks and credit cards payments for most programs. Payments are accepted from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m daily M-F

Get Our New Apps

View latest inspection results for food facilities on VC Safe Diner App or ocean water testing results for beaches on VC Safe Beach App

One-Stop Permitting

Step-by-step guidance on land use permits for residential, commercial, and industrial development projects or subdivisions in the unincorporated areas of the County

VC Citizen Access

Real-time land use, searchable database to track land use permits for properties located in the unincorporated areas of the County

Permit Navigator

Have you submitted a permit application but are experiencing difficulty in having your permit issued? Click on the above icon for assistance.

Quick Links

VC Resilient Coastal Adaptation

VC Resilient Coastal Adaptation

Coastal hazards associated with sea-level rise could have significant impacts on Ventura County. Recently, the County wa...

What's My Zoning?

What's My Zoning?

What's My Zoning? is a tool to help you find the zoning designation for parcels within the unincorporated areas of Ventu...

Film Permits

Film Permits

  County of Ventura Film Permit Requirements and Process The County of Ventura requires all commercial film product...

Counter Traffic Cam

Counter Traffic Cam

So that our customers may better assess the wait time they may expect when preparing to visit our public counters, the R...

Ventura County General Plan Update

Ventura County General Plan Update

Planning Home There is no private property owner initiated General Plan Amendment from at this time.  There is a C...

Interactive Mapping

Interactive Mapping

The County of Ventura Interactive Mapping Tool allows the user to choose various layers of information and to make queri...

Habitat Connectivity and Wildlife Corridor

Habitat Connectivity and Wildlife C...

Wildlife corridors connect fragmented patches of habitat. The main goal of a corridor (also referred to as a linkage) is...

Water Conservation Certificate

Water Conservation Certificate

  Please click here for the Certificate of Compliance for retrofit of plumbing upon addition or alteration to an ex...

Graywater and Rainwater Catchment

Graywater and Rainwater Catchment

Get information about minimum requirements for the installation of graywater systems in occupancies regulated by the Dep...

Water Well Permit Restrictions

Water Well Permit Restrictions

On December 16, 2014, the Board of Supervisors adopted ordinance (Ventura County Ordinance No. 4468). Section 4826.1 - W...

More Quick Links

  • Building and Safety Permit Fee Estimator +

    The Building Permit Fee Estimator is a tool that estimates your permits fees from various sources including the County of Ventura Building and Safety Division. As there are other County Read More
  • Mosquitoes & Vector Control +

    A vector is any insect, arthropod, or other animal of public health significance capable of harboring or transmitting the causative agent of human disease. Vector Control Program staff maintain constant Read More
  • Food Facilities Closure Reports +

    Closures or "permit Suspensions" are performed in response to Imminent Health Hazards present in a food facility that pose a serious health hazard if not immediately corrected. Such Imminent Health Read More
  • Hazardous Materials +

    The Ventura County Certified Unified Program Agency - CUPA / Hazardous Materials Program provides regulatory oversight for six statewide environmental programs. CUPA implements State and Federal laws and regulations, county ordinance code, Read More
  • Water Wise Gardening +

    Ventura County cities are in a serious drought. Most cities have water restrictions. Please click here for more information about Ventura County Water Wise Gardening. Please check with your individual Read More

Measure O - Commercial Cannabis Activity
Zoning Clearance Application

cannabis greenhouse

On November 3, 2020, Ventura County voters passed Measure O to allow cultivation of cannabis and ancillary activities in unincorporated Ventura County under certain conditions and standards and with proper permits. In addition to the successful completion of the state licensing process, entities wishing to engage in commercial cannabis cultivation within the county unincorporated area must also obtain two separate county permits: (1) A Cannabis Business License; and, (2) A Land Use/Entitlement Permit (i.e., Zoning Clearance). Both applications, including detailed instructions and step-by-step guidance regarding the Cannabis Business License and Zoning Clearance application processes and requirements can be found at the County Executive Office’s website at: https://www.ventura.org/cannabis/businesslicense.

Applications for a Cannabis Business License are being reviewed and processed by the County Executive Office. Cannabis Business License Applications and application fees should be submitted directly to the County Executive Office a This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Applications for a Commercial Cannabis Activity Zoning Clearance are being reviewed and processed by the County Planning Division and must be submitted directly to the County Planning Division at the following e-mail address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The fee for a Commercial Cannabis Activity Zoning Clearance is $1,500 Flat Fee.

1,200-foot Radius Map

The Commercial Cannabis Activity Zoning Clearance Application requires the applicant to provide a 1,200-foot radius map which demonstrates that there are no day care centers, schools, youth centers, drug rehabilitation centers, parks or residential neighborhoods (collectively, “sensitive uses”) within 1,200 feet of the premises (as defined in Section 2701), as measured in a straight line to the property line of the parcel containing a sensitive use. A sample 1,200-foot radius map can be viewed here. County GIS resources are available to assist interested parties in developing custom maps for a fee. If interested, please inquire at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Applicable definitions of the listed sensitive uses are provided in Section 2701 of the Ventura County Ordinance Code and are also provided below:

“Premises” means the designated structure or structures and land specified in the state application that is owned, leased or otherwise held under the control of the applicant where the commercial cannabis activity will be or is conducted.

“School” means an institution of learning for minors, whether public or private, offering a regular course of instruction required by the Education Code, or any preschool facility. This definition includes a nursery school, preschool, kindergarten, elementary school, middle or junior high school, senior high school, or any special institution of education, but it does not include a vocational or professional institution of higher education, including a community or junior college, or day care centers or youth centers.

“Day care center” means licensed infant centers, preschools, extended day care facilities, and school age child care centers, and includes child care centers licensed pursuant to Section 1596.95 of the Health and Safety Code, but does not include family day care homes.

“Youth centers” means any public or licensed private facility that is primarily used to host recreational or social activities for minors, including, but not limited to, private youth membership organizations or clubs, social service teenage club facilities, video arcades, or similar amusement park facilities.

“Drug rehabilitation center” means a state or local agency, a licensed private or nonprofit entity or combination thereof that operates drug abuse rehabilitation programs or offers medical or psychotherapeutic treatment for dependency on psychoactive substances.

“Park” means an area of land used for community recreation owned or operated by a public entity. This definition does not include any state or federal park or forestland.

“Residential neighborhood” means any of the urban residential zones enumerated in section 8104-3 as of March 4, 2020.

Questions?

If you have questions regarding the Commercial Cannabis Activity Zoning Clearance application process, questions should be directed to the County Planning Division at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by phone at (805) 654-5025.

If you have questions regarding the Cannabis Business License application process, questions should be directed to the County Executive Office at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by phone at (805) 654-5088.


Join the VC Resilient Interested Parties Notification List

Click here to subscribe to the VC Resilient stakeholder list.You will receive email notifications regarding this project and future public hearings.


Please Leave Comments

You may submit comments about the VC Resilient Coastal Adaptation Project and how you think the County should plan for sea level rise and coastal hazards in the form below at any time. These comments will help inform Planning Division staff on community concerns about sea level rise and help to begin a discussion about sea level rise adaptation measures.

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Click here to learn about the phases of VC Resilient, project timeline, and useful links.
VC Resilient Home Page

Phase I Grant

In 2018 the Coastal Commission awarded a grant to the County to conduct VC Resilient Phase I. The first step in the VC Resilient Project was development of a Vulnerability Assessment (click here). This assessment is an informational document that highlights potential impacts using three different sea level rise scenarios across the entire unincorporated County coastline. The Vulnerability Assessment includes analysis of sea level rise projections out to the year 2100. The best available science was used to complete the report with a range of projections, including those that we already face with high tides and storms.

Phase I also included a Sea Level Rise Adaptation Strategies Report (click here) that is an informational document that provides a summary of the Vulnerability Assessment results, describes various adaptation strategies that could be used to improve the resilience of unincorporated Ventura County, and provides some examples of adaptation pathways to help illustrate coastal adaptation planning approaches.

Planning Commission Work Session (Completed During Phase I)

The Sea Level Rise Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Strategies Report was reviewed and discussed during a work session before the Ventura County Planning Commission on March 7, 2019. The reports were revised based on comments received from the Planning Commission, Coastal Commission staff, and the public. The PowerPoint slideshow for the Planning Commission work session is available by clicking on the link below:

  • Click Here for the VC Resilient Planning Commission Work Session PowerPoint Presentation.
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Board of Supervisors Work Session (Completed During Phase I)

On September 10, 2019 a sea level rise work session was held by the Board of Supervisors. This public hearing provided an opportunity for public input, to share information on the County’s sea level rise vulnerabilities, and to receive Board guidance on proposed preliminary draft sea level rise policies and programs in key topical areas. This work session concluded Phase 1 of the VC Resilient Project. This work session did not include the formal adoption of any ordinance amendments or Coastal Area Plan policies. Rather, it focused on presenting information and tools to begin a conversation on how best to adapt to sea level rise. The proposed preliminary draft sea level rise policies, Board letter, PowerPoint slideshow and accompanying documents are available through the links below.

  • Click Here for the VC Resilient Board of Supervisors Work Session Materials
  • Click Here for the VC Resilient Board of Supervisors Work Session PowerPoint Presentation

At the work session, a request to apply for a grant to conduct Phase 2 of VC Resilient was authorized.


Phase II Grant

In early 2020 the Coastal Commission awarded a grant to the County to conduct VC Resilient Phase II. This next phase will include more detailed technical analyses, coordination with County staff in various departments, and additional public outreach. This will be followed by public hearings before the Ventura County Planning Commission, Board of Supervisors, and the Coastal Commission to certify Local Coastal Program coastal hazards policies and related Coastal Zoning Ordinance amendments. The grant for Phase II is scheduled to conclude in March 2022.

Other Useful Links for the VC Resilient Project

Please click on the links below to access the PowerPoint slideshows from public workshops for the Vulnerability Assessment that occurred on April 11, 2018.
  • Public Workshop "Frequently Asked Questions" handout (Completed During Phase I) Click Here
  • Workshop #1 (North-and Central Coast Focused; Completed During Phase I)PowerPoint Slideshow
  • Workshop #2 (South-Coast Focused; Completed During Phase I)PowerPoint Slideshow

Links to two established sea level rise models that were used to develop the Vulnerability Assessment are provided below:


Existing Local Coastal Program

Click here to access any of the following Ventura County LCP Planning documents:

  • Coastal Area Plan

  • Coastal Zoning Ordinance

  • Categorical Exclusion Order (E-83-1 & E-83-1A)

Coastal Maps for the Unincorporated Coastal Zone


VC Resilient Home Page
Sea level rise is a slow-moving threat, but it demands action. Inaction or delayed action may result in more costly damages and emergency repairs due to the cumulative effect of sea level rise, flooding, storms, and coastal erosion. While the County could choose to “wait and see” or follow a policy of “non-intervention,” this approach is likely to result in substantial damages and costly emergency repairs that could be avoided through proactive planning to ensure conservation of coastal resources and protection of development. The Ventura County Planning Division is working in collaboration with other County departments and community stakeholders to identify adaptation strategies in order to make the unincorporated areas of Ventura County more resilient in the face of rising sea levels.

 

Protect, Accommodate, and Retreat: Approaches to Coastal Adaptation

Sea level rise adaptation approaches generally fall into three main categories: protect, accommodate, or retreat. The most effective adaptation plan will use a combination of these approaches over time. A combination, or “hybrid” approach to adaptation allows for changing conditions and balances economic, environmental, and safety goals over time.

Video Coming Soon!

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The Protection Approach

slr dunesProtection strategies employ some sort of engineered structure or other measure to defend development (or other resources) in its current location without changes to the development itself. Protection strategies can be divided into “gray” and “green” defensive measures, and then further divided into “hard” and “soft” measures. A “gray”, “hard” approach is usually an engineered structure that can be positioned either alongshore (such as a seawall, revetment, or offshore breakwater) or cross-shore (such as a groin or harbor jetty). Cross-shore structures tend to trap sand and widen the beach up-coast of the structure. A “soft” protection approach may be to nourish beaches, while a “green”, “soft” approach may be to restore sand dunes.
The California Coastal Act allows protective devices for coastal-dependent uses, existing structures, and public beaches at risk of erosion when these seawalls and revetments are designed to eliminate or mitigate adverse impacts on local shoreline sand supply. It also directs that new development is sited and designed to not require future protection that may alter a natural shoreline. It is important to note that most protective devices are costly to construct, require steadily increasing maintenance costs, and have impacts on recreation, habitat, and natural defenses such as beaches and wetlands.

The Accommodation Approach

Accommodation strategies increase resilience to the impacts of sea level rise by employing methods that modify existing development or design new development to decrease hazard risks. On an individual project scale, these accommodation strategies include actions such as elevating structures, performing retrofits, using materials to increase the strength of development to handle additional wave impacts, building structures that can easily be removed during storms, or using additional setback distances to account for acceleration of erosion. On a community-scale, the accommodation strategies could be integrated into the land use plans, zoning ordinances, and strategic planning documents for partner agencies.

The Voluntary Retreat Approach

slr armoringRetreat strategies relocate or remove existing development out of hazard areas and limit the construction of new development in vulnerable areas. This approach is not an evacuation, but rather a strategic means of relocating the most vulnerable development and infrastructure out of harm’s way while maintaining coastal resources and access for future generations. Such strategies are commonly considered as longer-term options.

The Hybrid Approach

Inevitably, any successful adaptation effort will require a range of strategies that vary across both spatial and temporal scales. Consistent monitoring and thresholds associated with the changing sea levels can be used to transition from one strategy to the other. Once a given sea level rise amount is reached, the planning or implementation of another strategy would be triggered. Even though every approach will be some form of a hybrid, it is useful to think about the general categories of adaptation strategies described above to help frame the discussion.

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 Maladaptation and Cumulative Effects

Avoiding “maladaptation” is an important component of long-term planning for sea level rise. It occurs when an adaptation strategy becomes more harmful than helpful. When identifying appropriate adaptation responses, the following principles reduce the risk of maladaptation (Barnett, J. & O’Neill; Maladaptation, Global Climate Change; 2010):

  1. The strategy should support the protective role of ecosystems and sustaining their physical processes.

  2. The strategy should avoid disproportionately burdening the most vulnerable citizens.

  3. The strategy should avoid high-costs, unless holistic economic work (including ecosystem services, infrastructure upgrades, and damages) demonstrates a strong net benefit over time.

  4. The strategy should incentivize adaptation (e.g., reward early actors).

  5. The strategy should increase flexibility and not lock the community into a single long-term solution.
  6. The strategy should reduce decision-making time horizons to better incorporate the evolving science of sea level rise.

  7. The strategy should not increase long-term greenhouse gas emissions.

  8. The strategy should account for long-term maintenance costs over time, and those costs should be lower than they would be without use of the strategy.

slr leveeOne adaptation measure may reduce an identified hazard in the short term but also lead to unintended secondary effects in the long-term. An example of maladaptation is the levee system for the City of New Orleans. While the levees provided for short-term adaptation and allowed communities to remain in areas that lie below sea level, they increased the long-term vulnerability to flooding¾ both by providing a false sense of security and by being under-engineered or insufficiently maintained to account for the impact of large storm events.

Adaptation Strategies Report

The Planning Division’s Sea Level Rise Adaptation Strategies Report is available by clicking on the link below. The Adaptation Strategies Report provides a summary of the Vulnerability Assessment results, describes various adaptation strategies that could be used to improve the resilience of unincorporated Ventura County, and provides examples of adaptation pathways to help illustrate coastal adaptation planning approaches.

The revised Sea Level Rise Adaptation Strategies Report was reviewed and discussed during a work session before the Ventura County Planning Commission on March 7, 2019 and the Board of Supervisors on September 10, 2019. The Sea Level Rise Adaptation Strategies Report and PowerPoint slideshow for the Planning Commission and Board of Supervisors work sessions are available by clicking on the links below:

Click here to complete a brief survey to provide your opinion on sea level rise adaptation planning


VC Resilient Home Page

Why are Sea Levels Rising and By How Much?

As temperatures increase globally, sea levels are subsequently rising as a result of a few major factors. First, as ocean temperatures warm, the water in the ocean expands and occupies more space, resulting in higher sea levels. Second, increased temperatures lead mountain glaciers and ice caps to melt at faster rates, increasing the water in the ocean. Extreme ice loss from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets is increasing the amount of water in the ocean. If all the ice on earth was to melt, sea levels would rise by approximately 220 feet above present-day levels! Ice melt is predicted to soon become the primary contributor to global sea-level rise. In California, ice loss from Antarctica, causes higher sea-level rise than the global average. For example, if the loss of Antarctic ice were to cause global sea-level to rise by 1 foot, the associated sea-level rise in California would be about 1.25 feet (OPC, 2018).

Scientific understanding of sea level rise is constantly evolving and advancing rapidly, as understanding grows of the natural climate cycles and human impacts. The exact rate and magnitude of sea level rise over the next century is uncertain, though it is steadily increasing. Sea level rise is a slow-moving threat, but this is not a reason for inaction. The first step in effective sea level rise planning is to understand the amount the sea will rise and where impacts are likely to occur.

By the year 2100, the sea level is slr too close to shoreexpected to rise between 3 feet to over 10 feet. The range reflects variations in future climate change emissions, ocean warming, and ice sheet loss (Parris et al. 2012). In the US, A 5-foot increase in water levels caused by sea level rise is estimated to affect 499,822 people, 644,143 acres, 209,737 homes, and $105.2 billion of property value in coastal areas across the United States (Climate Central, 2014).Sea level rise will not have the same effect everywhere around the world. Local sea level rise is measured using data collected by tide gauges. The Santa Monica tide gauge shows an average historical rate of sea level rise of about 1.5 mm per year, an average of about a half an inch per decade. Given the existing GHG emissions, the long-term time scale, and feedback mechanisms evaluated in the latest science, the rate of sea level rise is projected to accelerate in the future, resulting in an increasingly upward curve (see figure below).

slr chart1

The numbers in the table on the right are slr chart2color-coded to represent the solid lines in the chart above, they show the amounts of sea level rise that are projected to occur along the lines at specific years. For example, the purple line shows that by the year 2100, there could be over 10 feet of sea level rise. When sea level rise combines with coastal storms, the flooding becomes even more severe, as described further below.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability Assessment Report: How will Ventura County be Impacted?

Locally, early impacts of rising seas are already being experienced, including coastal flooding during storms, periodic tidal flooding, and increased coastal erosion. Sea level rise will lead to higher tides, more extensive coastal flooding. Rising sea levels alone will not be the primary cause of damage to County resources and infrastructure. These impacts will be caused by coastal erosion during large wave events.

Ventura County is working in collaboration with community stakeholders to identify the impacts sea level rise will have on the County. The Ventura County Planning Division, through the VC Resilient Coastal Adaptation Project, is planning for sea level rise in the unincorporated areas which includes the 29 miles of coastline shown in the map below. Sea level rise will not have the same effect everywhere. For example, in unincorporated Ventura County, the mountainous coastal areas on the North and South Coast (red and yellow-colored areas on the map below) fewer acres of land will be affected by sea level rise compared to the low lying, relatively flat Central Coast (green-colored areas on the map) on the Oxnard Plain.

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The first step in the VC Resilient Project was development of a Vulnerability Assessment that was completed in 2018. This assessment is an informational document that highlights potential impacts using three different sea level rise scenarios across the entire unincorporated County coastline that extend out to year 2100. The report also estimated the combined effects of sea level rise with powerful waves from coastal storms, extreme rain events that could overtop the banks of the Santa Clara River, and erosion of shoreline beaches and bluffs. The best available science was used to complete the report.

According to the Vulnerability Assessment, only 8 inches of sea level rise in the unincorporated areas of the County would expose 1,580 acres of prime agricultural land, 1,516 structures, and over 33 miles of roadways to coastal hazards. With about 5 feet of sea level rise, these estimates increase to 2,085 acres of prime agricultural land, 2,230 structures, and 54 miles of roadways. The economic impacts could be severe, with over $2.3 billion in property at risk due to coastal flooding and erosion during a large coastal storm that combines with 5 feet of sea level rise. Over $800 million in property values could be exposed to monthly tidal inundation. Also, the report estimated that coastal flooding and tidal inundation could result in around $30 to $58 million in economic loss due to decreased agricultural productivity.

Click here to watch a brief video which provides an overview of sea level rise science and the Vulnerability Assessment results.

Video coming soon!

Click on the links below to read the Vulnerability Assessment. Due to the large file size, the assessment has been broken into segments.

The Vulnerability Assessment is a starting point for a common understanding of the risks, but it does not provide solutions. There are few easy solutions and most require additional coordination and dialogue with members of the public, including private landowners, with surrounding cities, and with other state and federal resource agencies. This first step is a comprehensive look at the resources that are exposed and an evaluation of how sensitive these assets are to sea level rise.

Click here to learn about Sea Level Rise Adaptation and to review the Adaptation Report.


VC Resilient Home Page